Friday, August 12, 2011

Yuengling Oktoberfest Beer!

An announcement like this from America's Oldest Brewery deserves to be published in full at a Pennsylvania-based beer blog! Yuengling continues to deliver -- slowly -- on long-made promises of more beers.

Yuengling Oktoberfest Beer, and Festival, Coming This Fall
Live polka and dance music, delicious German cuisine, plenty of family fun, and a new Yuengling Oktoberfest Beer highlight the first-ever Oktoberfest Presented by Yuengling September 29 - October 2 and October 6 - 9 at the new SteelStacks arts and cultural campus in Bethlehem, PA.

The Yuengling Brewery has partnered with ArtsQuest, a non-profit organization dedicated to music, the arts, and cultural experiences, to produce an authentic festival to pay tribute to Yuengling’s German heritage. Highlighting the event is the 130-foot by 260-foot Yuengling Festhalle tent, featuring waitresses dressed in dirndl outfits, Bavarian-style food, over 40 live performances, and plenty of Yuengling Oktoberfest Beer.

“Anticipation has been high for our new Oktoberfest Beer, and we’re particularly excited about creating an authentic Oktoberfest atmosphere at the festival for all to enjoy,” commented Lou Romano, Marketing Manager.

Copper in color, Yuengling Oktoberfest is a medium bodied beer with a perfect blend of roasted malts to capture a true representation of the style. Yuengling fans that can not make it to the Oktoberfest event can enjoy the product at their local taverns, as Yuengling Oktoberfest Beer will be available seasonally, in ¼ and ½ Barrels in all markets where Yuengling is sold, beginning in late August.

"With the successful creation of Musikfest and the SteelStacks campus in the Lehigh Valley, we at the Yuengling Brewery felt it appropriate to show our support for Jeff Parks and all of the people at ArtsQuest who contribute to making arts and culture flourish in our community," said Dick Yuengling. "At Oktoberfest, there will be plenty of opportunities to hear live music, have some family fun and share some company under the big tent. Plus great beer and food too."

Oktoberfest presented by Yuengling tickets are now on sale at www.artsquest.org and 610-332-3378. Festival hours are 6 p.m.-midnight on Thursdays, noon-midnight on Fridays-Saturdays, and noon-9 p.m. Sundays. Single-day admission tickets are $8 in advance and $10 at the gate. Single-day admission tickets for children ages 6-12 are $3 in advance and $5 at the gate, while ages under 6 are admitted free. A Weekend Pass, good for one entire weekend, is $20 in advance and $25 at the gate.

18 comments:

Anonymous said...

Any word on what kinzua dam brewing is and where it is going to be. Docksiders I hope

Lew Bryson said...

Not that this has anything to do with the Yuengling post, but...
http://www.lcbapps.lcb.state.pa.us/webapp/Agency/SearchCenter/PublicLicenseeSearchDisplay.asp?P1=X&P2=&P3=&P4=L&P5=&P6=&P7=&P8=KINZUA&P9=&P10=&P11=&P12=&P13=&P14=&P15=

And now you know as much as I do.

Anonymous said...

Sorry lew but I grew up in elk and I told my dad that I would find out for him and were the first to come to mind

Lew Bryson said...

No worries; email works fine, but this is okay, too.

sam k said...

Cool! And not just good news from Yuengling, but today I saw Stegmaier Okto and their new Pumpkin Ale at my local distributor. (Not that they're likely to publicize that for whatever reason...)

The Pennsylvania tradition just keeps on rolling!

Anonymous said...

Sorry, but I get no more excited about Yuengling's latest corn beer than I do about the offerings of the other adjunct brewers. Let's hope they also have something from the local craft brewers such as Weyerbachers or Brew Works on tap in those tents, too.

Lew Bryson said...

I'm sorry...was there something about "corn" in this release that I missed? I don't think it's a good idea to dismiss a beer (and a brewery) before you've even tasted it. After all, you would have denied yourself the sometimes excellent Saranac beers that way. Why dismiss it out of hand?

The Professor said...

Anon (the no corn guy) could just be jealous of Yuengling's continued success and incredible growth in the last three decades since they were on the brink of closing.
Seems to me they are doing something right.

Even if this beer does have some corn in it (which as Lew points out, there was no mention of) so what if there is, as long as the beer is good?

The false "all adjunct is bad" idea that some industry folks are trying to foist on the public is just that: hype. And a pantload of crap. And there's plenty of proof out there that it's just wrong.

Fortunately, not everyone (including some fine micro and pub breweries) buys into it. Fuller's ESB also comes to mind...it is a luscious and grand beer, and it happens that corn is one of the ingredients (along with sugar!).

It's HOW you use adjunct fermentables that really matters.

Steven said...

"Copper in color, Yuengling Oktoberfest is a medium bodied beer with a perfect blend of roasted malts to capture a true representation of the style."

As an Oktoberfest-Märzen enthusiast who enjoys a good amber lager, and loves this time of year, I really hope this isn't another Ami-Okto that uses too much roasted malt and turns out tasting more like a lagered brown ale than a true Oktoberfest.

Just me.

Lew Bryson said...

I hear you, but...if it is, I'm almost thinking 'Don't blame Yuengling.' Damn craft brewers...

Steven said...

"Damn craft brewers..."

Heh, yeah -- I suppose. Never been able to figure that out, but I imagine it's because none of the "craft brews" can get their hands on the right malt, so they improvise.

The American Style Octoberfest will be a new BJCP style before we know it, and the Munich Amber Märzen will be just a distant memory. Sad.

Anonymous said...

Funny how you can throw any sort of fruit, vegetable, solid or liquid into a "craft" beer and it is somehow innovative and ingenious but if you use corn (whose taste I happen to enjoy) which has been used for generations it is undesirable.

Snobs are lame, they are ruining beer for the rest of us.

Steven said...

Anon -- if it makes you feel any better, I don't like any extra ingredients in my beer. Well, maybe Wheat or Rye, but the German brewers made that acceptable a long time ago.

Steven said...

Oh, and Prof -- I think most of understand the difference in a beer brewed with flaked maize of corn grits... and we know which we'd rather drink.

That said, of course - and as Lew points out, the question seems moot with this new Oktoberfest.

steve, no "n" said...

I have a feeling this is going to be closer to a hofbrau O-fest than an american one. Just my (rather round) gut feeling based on Yuengling.
As for the venue, I was out at the Yuengling Cafe in the Artsquest building for a concert last month and it's a beautiful place. (The beer list included a couple of others besides Yuengling beers) Bethlehem is trying to do some good things and I'll go to this fest and support this new place and hope to see the area grow some more.

sam k said...

I miss the Lion Oktoberfest...at the brewery!

geoffrobinson said...

I'm happy for Yuengling's success, but I would assume it has to do with Traditional Lager. And for a macro beer, I think it uses less adjunct than the normal macro beer. Am I wrong on that or are my memories from the brewery tour off-base? (I took the tour just before getting into craft beer.)

Dan said...

Just had it at the State College Microbrew Expo and it was very good. It was one of the better lagers I tasted ( Penns Imperial Pilsner was the best).